Turning great ideas into healthier communities

Program

Population Health Innovation Lab (PHIL)

PHI’s Population Health Innovation Lab (PHIL) brings new options for innovation to public health. In the same way that Silicon Valley creates lasting change through new perspectives on old challenges, at PHIL we use new approaches, new technologies, and new partnerships to develop solutions for our communities’ most complex problems—and then share and spread what works.

Working directly with communities in need, PHIL moves beyond the symptoms to address the root issues and the systems at the heart of the challenge. We bring together a wide range of communities, innovators, funders, and public health professionals to use new tools and methodologies in new ways.

At the same time, we also harness the assets PHI has amassed over its 50 years at the forefront of public health: nationally ranked researchers, diverse and proven programs, strong infrastructure, and a wide network of partners.

Program Director(s)

Sue Grinnell
Suzanne Ryan-Ibarra

Projects

California Accountable Communities for Health Initiative (CACHI)

In late 2016, PHI partnered with Community Partners, State of California along with several other funders to launch the California Accountable Communities for Health Initiative (CACHI), which aims to modernize our health system, building on the Accountable Communities for Health (ACH) model. CACHI brings together clinical providers with public health departments, schools, social service agencies, community organizations, and others to improve critical health issues such as heart disease, diabetes, trauma, and promote greater health equity.

In 2017, CACHI expanded from 6 to 15 communities throughout California, to involve local communities in Southern California, the Central Valley, and Northern California. Each partner brings a unique set of skills and knowledge to change the environments that people live in, and will work together to address the root causes of health and inequities where they live.

PHIL provides support to 9 of the 15 communities. The approach includes a revised Curriculum and Playbook, one on one and group calls, convening, web discussions on relevant topics, Individualized supports and Technical Assistance Offerings (limited), resource brokerage, document repository website. Through peer learning, there is an opportunity to come together as learners, share perspectives, and broaden perspectives gaining a wider systemic perspective of population health and how to be more equipped to address the needs of their communities.

Community Platform and Curriculum

Develop a training curriculum for the California Accountable Communities for Health (CACHI) sites across the state. Launch and support an online social network platform to host materials and encourage cross sector collaboration.

Leveraging Collaboration to End Domestic Violence

Create a multi-county initiative that will develop meaningful policy change to address factors that contribute to domestic violence and adverse childhood experiences, while utilizing the Public Health Innovation Lab’s methodology of facilitation and technical innovation.

Northern ACEs Collaborative

Many Northern California Counties are disproportionately affected by high Adverse Child Experiences (ACE) scores relative to other regions in California. Domestic violence is an indicator in the ACE spectrum along with other Social Determinants of Health, which play a critical role in healthy families. A group of stakeholders from six northern California counties —Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Shasta, Tehama, and Trinity—have come together to form a multi-sector collaborative to identify and address opportunities for policy and systems change that mitigate issues of trauma and domestic violence using the Life-Course Model. Representatives from over 26 organizations, and sectors including healthcare, K-12 education, early-years and childcare, social services, domestic violence agencies, and public health, have contributed time and resources to the Collaborative. Blue Shield of CA Foundation has recognized the value that this unique collaborative can provide to support their goals related to ending domestic violence. Stakeholders from across the five counties have convened to develop and establish a clear set of priorities and action steps to address identified root causes of ACEs and the linkage to domestic violence. Learn more.


Here's How We're Making a Difference

Bringing State Efforts Together and Finding Common Ground through a Learning Lab

PHI's Population Health Innovation Lab  facilitated a group of 10 hospital service area sites across Vermont in their work to become Accountable Communities of Health (ACH). PHIL designed and helped Vermont use an innovative and unique approach of a cross-site learning journey.

By exploring what it means to be an ACH, PHIL helped the individual communities from across the state to learn from one another, share solutions, work collectively on common challenges, and build new capacities and systems infrastructure. This effort, funded by the Federal Center for Medicare Medicaid and Innovation, enabled Vermont to better address complex population health problems at the community and statewide level.

Read the report: Vermont Accountable Communities for Health (ACH) Peer Learning Lab Report

California Accountable Communities of Health

PHI's Population Health Innovation Lab applied its lessons in building Accountable Communities of Health (ACHs) in Vermont to California. In 2017, PHIL designed and facilitated an ACH process for California,designing a learning lab for 10 sites across the state.  PHIL’s unique access to PHI’s tools, resources, and solutions offered an important opportunity for the Lab to bridge and broker innovative relationships across its growing work.

Helping the CDC Chronic Disease Center Roll out New Metrics

PHIL facilitated a working group across six states for the Center for Disease Control’s National Association of Chronic Disease Directors. States previously reported to the CDC on 200 different measures, including many for which data were difficult to access. This new PHIL-supported effort enabled State Chronic Disease Directors to create new criteria for Chronic Disease Funding performance measures that better reflect the reality of reporting states. This PHIL-supported effort will streamline reporting and enable more effective demonstration of meaningful impact.

Increasing Transparency, and Efficacy, for Hospital Community Benefit Investments Nationwide

Even while community benefit is a requirement of nonprofit hospitals across the country—channeling billions of dollars into innovative projects and high-need communities—performance data on the efficacy of those efforts has been difficult to access. This inhibits evidence-based planning and challenges health equity-based outcomes.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation engaged PHIL to design and launch a new national center for Community Benefit tools, data analysis, and technical assistance, working in partnership with the Research Triangle Institute. The new Community Benefit Transparency to Action Coordinating Center will allow for better access to data, improved collaboration, and ultimately programs that are even more impactful for the communities that need them most.

Reality Testing for New Core Metrics from the Institute for Medicine

After the Institute of Medicine (IOM) decided to replace over 200 measurements with 15 new core metrics in domain areas, the IOM brought in PHIL to see how the measures would be utilized in real life. PHIL tested the feasibility and utility of these metrics in two California communities to give the IOM essential user feedback.

Funded by the Blue Shield of California Foundation, PHIL hosted two convenings full of innovative approaches, including “graphic facilitation” that uses images to document and guide the meeting, new models of community input, and the creation of a data visualization tool. These methods both helped the communities to better understand the metrics in their own context, and also provided the IOM with valuable data from users on the ground.

Strengthening Family Violence Prevention Programs

Recognizing the value of PHIL’s innovative approaches to conference design and facilitation, the Permanente Medical Group of Kaiser Permanente Northern California engaged PHIL to plan, lead, and analyze their annual Family Violence Prevention Program conference, which featured 5 keynotes and 425 participants.

PHIL helped the group to achieve their goals of transforming Kaiser’s current strategy of incorporating violence prevention work internally to also seek opportunities for stronger external connections, and to generate ideas to inform and support next steps by Kaiser leadership—helping to support one common goal: reducing family violence and supporting its victims.