Turning great ideas into healthier communities

Program

Cultiva La Salud/Central California Regional Obesity Prevention Program

(PHI program 2011-2018)

The Central California Regional Obesity Prevention Program (CCROPP) began in 2005 as a model program utilizing a policy and environmental change approach to help community members gain access to healthy food, beverages and safe spaces to be physically active. Central to CCROPP's work, the leadership training program (Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities Leadership Program) worked closely with local residents to help them gain the critical skills and tools to take on leadership roles and help to create healthier communities.vAs a regional initiative, CCROPP brought together public health departments, community based organizations and grassroots community members to work together in addressing the policy, system and environmental factors that contribute to obesity and obesity related illnesses. CCROPP's many local successes include changing local ordinances to allow for the establishment of farmer’s markets and unlocking school gates for physical activity.

In 2016, CCROPP transitioned to Cultiva La Salud. The goal of Cultiva La Salud, which literally means “cultivate health” in Spanish, was to increase access to environments with healthy food or beverage options and increase access to physical activity opportunities. Through these approaches Cultiva La Salud increased the daily consumption of fruits, vegetables, healthy beverages and increase physical activity among the targeted Latino population. The project worked in partnership with the Dolores Huerta Foundation and the Ceres Partnership for Healthy Children.

 

 


Here's How We're Making a Difference

Baile Folklórico and Bicycles Keep the Central Valley Moving

Cultiva La Salud engages with community residents to help inform decision makers around improving access to healthy food and beverages and opportunities to be physically active. 
 
In 2016, Cultiva La Salud and Ceres Partnership for Healthy Children established a shared-use agreement which opened school space to residents in Ceres, a rural town in California’s Central Valley where nearly 70% of residents are obese or overweight. Today, 23,000 Latinos living nearby have increased their physical activity by participating in Bailoterapia, a form of aerobic dance akin to Zumba.

 

Building Cultural Resilience and Health in Fresno, California

PHI's Cultiva La Salud is helping to improve the food environment in Fresno CA, converting existing food vendors in the city's food deserts into healthy food vendors for the Latino community—including outfitting vendors with new bicycle carts. By removing unhealthy food while increasing access to healthy options, the project is promoting healthier diets and ultimately helping to reducing the onset of chronic disease. The mobile vendors now sell freshly-cut fruits, vegetables and other healthy options, share nutrition information and connect residents to supplemental nutrition programs. They serve as health champions in their community by providing access to healthy foods, but also act as role models for biking and as ambassadors linking business to public health and prevention. 

The initiative garnered Cultiva La Salud a win in the state’s Let’s Get Healthy California Innovation Challenge.

School Farm Stands Support Healthier Eating

Cultiva la Salud is supporting school farm stands to help create greater access to local fruits and vegetables for low-income residents in Southeast Fresno. Residents can purchase fresh produce using their CalFresh benefits.